Pin-up has always been a timeless genre for me. It's something I would come back again and again, never getting tired of making new pieces with it. My inspirations for this look has always been two artists: Albert Vargas and Gil Elvgren. You can Google them up to see their respective styles. As for this shoot, I was look more into Elvgren's look and feel.

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With the proper lighting, pushing the image into a pin-up look isn't really a huge a task afterwards. The little secret is defining the shadows and highlights in a particular way that would make them linear in appearance, much the same way their painted counterparts were done. That meant controlling the harshness of the lights you use. In this case, my weapon of choice for the main light is a beauty dish. On its opposite side is strip light to give off that soft highlight, while on the other side is a strobe with a regular reflector (no grid) to give a harsh reflection. Two lights are dedicated for the background, and one softbox is placed behind the beauty dish acting as a fill, controlling the amount of shadows you get from the harsh lights.

I used a white acrylic sheet as a flooring, and when the background lights hit, it bounced enough to give that specular highlight at the skin edges of the model.

Not all models are fit to do this kind of look. The more diverse the model is from the established archetype, the stronger the cues you have to put in the image to familiarize your audience. In the case of our model Anthea, she was quite the shoe-in for this look. A simple beauty shot sans the wardrobe and accessories already gave strong hints of the genre because of proper casting. The ribbon cost me P 50.00 in a nearby Landmark Department Store.

Production Credits:

  • Make-up: Oliver Bumatay
  • Styling: Model's Own
  • Model: Anthea Murfet

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